Mornington Wilderness Camp –
Eco Camping In The Kimberleys

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Last time, we checked out Bell Gorge and Silent Grove. Go here if you missed it.

We left Silent Grove and headed to Mornington Wildlife Sanctuary.


What Exactly Is Mornington Wildlife Sanctuary?

In a nutshell, it’s a huge tract of land privately owned by a non-profit organisation called the Australian Wildlife Conservancy. They have an excellent website explaining who they are, what they do and lots of detail on the Mornington Wildlife Sanctuary.

A beautiful rainbow bee-eater, Mornington Wilderness Camp.
The Australian Wildlife Conservancy is dedicated to preserving habitats for native fauna and flora. This beautiful rainbow bee-eater is just one species thriving in this environment.

 

BONUS: “The Gibb River Road – A Traveller’s Guide”

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Mornington Wilderness Camp – the subject of this article – is simply the accommodation facility within the Sanctuary.

The emphasis is on conservation, not tourism. Keep this in mind when you visit.







Imintji Roadhouse

On the way we called into Imintji Roadhouse on the Gibb River Road (GRR). It’s a neat and tidy place, but only sells diesel – a trap for the unwary. Since we last visited, Imintji closed down for a while but has since re-opened. You can also buy basic supplies.

Imintji Roadhouse on the Gibb River Road.
Imintji Roadhouse on the Gibb River Road.
Our camper trailer outside Imintji Roadhouse, Gibb River Road.
Our dusty camper trailer outside Imintji Roadhouse.


A Meatworks In The Middle Of Nowhere

Mornington is about 90km south-east once you turn off the GRR. Generally the road was pretty good, with a few gates and lots of dips. The last 20km or so deteriorates into a rocky track, but nothing too taxing.

Lots of gates on the way to Mornington Wilderness Camp.
Our resident gate-opener doing a great job!
On the road to Mornington Wilderness Camp.
On the road to Mornington Wilderness Camp. King Leopold Ranges are in the distance.
King Leopold Ranges in the distance, across the vast plains. On the road to Mornington Wilderness Camp.
King Leopold Ranges in the distance, across the vast plains.

The country deteriorates as you travel south-east. You are in fact on the boundary between more arable country to the north and the endless deserts to the south.

We passed an old meatworks en route to Mornington Wilderness Camp, set up in the 1950s. Cattle were slaughtered there and then flown out whole. Maybe it made sense at the time, but I can fully understand how this venture wasn’t viable – it’s just so far from any market.

Abandoned meat works, on the road to Mornington Wilderness Camp.
Looks like the perfect place to set up a meat works. What could possibly go wrong…
The fine red dust is like talculm powder. On the road to Mornington Wilderness Camp.
The fine red dust is like talculm powder. It gets in your eyes and up your nose.


Shady Trees, Serenity… And Birds Everywhere!

Mornington Wilderness Camp is a great spot for campers – plenty of shade, flushing toilets and hot showers. It is expensive though. You might want to check out the prices before driving all the way in there. Although remember the place is run by Australian Wildlife Conservancy, a non-profit organisation. So your camp fees are really a donation to a good cause.

Cool and shady campsite at Mornington Wilderness Camp.
Cool and shady campsite at Mornington Wilderness Camp.





Walking back to camp, Mornington Wilderness Camp.
Walking back to camp.

The campsite backs onto Annie Creek and the whole area was rich with birds. A birdwatcher’s paradise! An easy walk along the creek is an opportune time to stretch your legs and see some of these beautiful birds up close.

The walking track along Annie Creek winds amongst the foliage. Mornington Wilderness Camp.
The walking track along Annie Creek winds amongst the foliage.
Annie Creek, Mornington Wilderness Camp.
Annie Creek. Love those pandanus palms.
We encountered this old tree on the walking track along Annie Creek at Mornington Wilderness Camp.
We encountered this old tree on the walking track along Annie Creek.
Looking south from Annie Creek at Mornington Wilderness Camp.
Looking south from Annie Creek. Compared to further north, this country is quite dry.





A pair of corellas, Mornington Wilderness Camp.
A pair of corellas taking in the view.
Magnificent sunset at Mornington Wilderness Camp.
Yet another magnificent outback sunset.


If you’re looking for Kimberley tours, cruises or places to stay, TourRadar have a good selection for you to choose from.

Next time: There’s so much more to see at Mornington Wildlife Sanctuary.

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Any errors or omissions are mine alone.


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